Ann Marie Puig

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Ann Marie Puig

Entrepreneur Philanthropist driving creative ideas and forward thinking to communities.

Ann Marie Puig offers tips for managing successful business sales strategies

Ann Marie Puig offers tips for managing successful business sales strategies

Regardless of whether a sales rep has appropriately qualified a prospect and accurately dealt with their desires through the business procedure, the arrangement can quickly come to an end on even the smallest of details. Being a sales negotiator requires a certain set of skills, and successful Costa Rican businesswoman Ann Marie Puig offers some advice on how to manage sales strategies to secure the deal.

Understanding some principle qualities will go a long way with clients. Always speak second and steer clear of ranges. It’s almost never a good idea to be willing to split the difference, and the terms of the deal don’t need to be put in writing until all of the details have been clearly defined. Adds Puig, “One of the most important negotiating strategies is also one of the simplest – always give in order to receive.”

Without giving it much thought, a 30% markdown or extra a half year of assistance may appear to be satisfactory. It’s just when you return to your office and begin drafting up the agreement that you understand you consented to terms you can’t or shouldn’t acknowledge. Plainly characterizing the points of price limits, complimentary gifts, or other additional items before you meet with your prospect will guarantee you reach a mutually beneficial agreement.

You’ve exhibited the terms of the arrangement, and the prospect might want to negotiate them, so give them a chance to begin the discussion. In order to appease the client, salespeople are regularly enticed to offer a markdown or a change before the prospect even opens their mouth. In any case, you don’t have a clue what they’re going to say. It pays to listen first, and then talk.

In the event that the client might want cash knocked off your item’s sticker price, don’t state, “Well, I could most likely diminish the expense by 15 or 20%.” Who might acknowledge 15% when 20% has been advertised? Continuously quote one specific number and, after that, go higher or lower as needed. “Between” ought to be maintained at a strategic distance at all times.

Negotiations can swing forward and backward – around once more. Numerous thoughts will be proposed, and, although some will be acknowledged, others will be shot down. Asserts Puig, “A sales rep would be smart not to reconsider the agreement until the meeting has finished, and all those involved have verbally consented to the terms.”

It might seem obvious, but never negotiate with anyone other than the decision maker. This will lead to quicker closings and more solid interaction with the target entity.

One of the most important tips to remember – and one that is often overlooked – is that not all deals are feasible. Says Puig, “Sometimes, it’s necessary to simply walk away from a possible deal. On the off chance that requests become preposterous or unbeneficial for the organization, don’t be reluctant to leave the negotiations. A client who possibly consented to sign if the agreement was profoundly corrected or the cost was substantially dropped will undoubtedly cause issues in the future. What’s more, since they plainly don’t see much an incentive in the offering, it won’t be long until they turned out to be disappointed. Get out for your own good, and that of your prospect.”